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32 Trial(s) displayed. Page 1 2 3 4   Next
Category: Brain / CNS
A Phase III Clinical Trial Evaluating DCVax®-L, Autologous DendriticCells(DC) Pulsed With Tumor Lysate Antigen For The Treatment Of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

A Study of Vaccine (DCVax®-L) to treat Newly Diagnosed GBM Brain Cancer - This study is for people with newly diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study is to determine if adding a vaccine called DCVax®-L to your standard treatment of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy can slow the growth and recurrence of your brain tumor.

To be eligible for this study, you must be:

  • Recently diagnosed with GBM and your doctor is planning for you to have surgery to remove all or most of their tumor, followed by the standard radiation therapy and chemotherapy.
  • Are between 18 to 70 years old

The vaccine is made from your own cells that are taken from your blood and made into a vaccine after it has been processed.

The study involves a series of injections under your skin, given in your upper arm with either the active vaccine (DCVax®-L) or placebo vaccine (an inactive drug of salt water injection that has no treatment value). There is a 2 out of 3 chance of receiving the active vaccine vs. the placebo. Patients receiving the placebo vaccine who have tumor progression during treatment can switch to the active vaccine.

The vaccine (DCVax®-L) or placebo is supplied free of charge. You will receive a total of 5-10 vaccines, 2 injections for each time dose. Vaccines will be given at various intervals over two and a half years. You will be followed for a total of three years from the time you have your first vaccine.

This study is randomized, which means you are automatically assigned by a computer to receive either the active vaccine or the placebo vaccine. Neither you nor your doctor can choose which treatment you will get. This study is also double-blinded, thus both you and your doctor will not know which vaccine you are receiving.



Category: Hematologic
A Phase III Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial to Study the Safety and Efficacy of V212 in Adult Patients with Solid Tumor or Hematologic Malignancy

A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Inactivated Varicella-zoster Vaccine (VZV) as a Preventative Treatment for Herpes Zoster (HZ) and HZ-related Complications in Adult Participants with Solid Tumor or Hematologic Malignancy (V212-011 AM3) - This double-blinded, randomized clinical trial is looking to see if a vaccine called V212 (varicella-zoster virus vaccine) can prevent shingles and extend life in people who are at high risk of developing shingles. You are at high risk for developing shingles if you have cancer (either a solid tumor malignancy (STM) or hematologic malignancy (HM)) or other conditions which weaken your immune system.

Herpes Zoster (HZ), known as shingles, is the reactivation of VZV (varicella-zoster virus), which originally infected your system as chickenpox (varicella). This virus may remain inactive in your body for many years until it is stirred up again and causes HZ. In this clinical trial, the safety, side effects, and effectiveness of the study vaccine will be analyzed.

The vaccine is injected in your upper arm. There are two treatment groups:

Group A: will receive the study vaccine V212, four times, about 30 days apart.

Group B: will receive the placebo (a vaccine with no active ingredients), four times, about 30 days apart.

After signing the informed consent agreeing to take part in this study, your doctor will perform a physical exam and record your history to ensure you are eligible to participate. You will give a blood sample before you receive the first vaccine and after you receive the last vaccine. You will also be given a vaccine report card to record your temperature, any side effects you may experience and record any medications you are taking.



Category: Liver Cancer
A Treatment of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma with TheraSphere® (Yttrium-90 Glass Microspheres): An HDE Treatment Use

TheraSphere treatment for inoperable liver cancer - This clinical trial is being conducted to provide access to TheraSphere treatment to patients with liver cancer who cannot be treated by surgical removal of the tumor.  Treatment with TheraSphere selectively gives a radioactive material to tumor site (s) in the liver of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Based on experience gained in previous studies and well-established interventional radiology techniques, this protocol allows multiple treatments with TheraSphere® that may be delivered on an inpatient or outpatient basis. Patients may receive a single dose to the whole liver, or treatments delivered as a sequence of treatments approximately 30 - 90 days apart. A specific plan will be developed for each patient, based upon the presenting condition of the patient, the blood vessel anatomy, and the desired goal of treatment.  Tumor response rates will be measured as well as patients experience and toxicities associated with TheraSphere® treatment. 


Category: Leukemia
BMS CA180-330: Studying Interventions for Managing Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Chronic Phase: The 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study (SIMPLICITY)

Data collection study for patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia - This data collection study is being conducted to obtain and analyze information on the treatment and management of patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML). This may help improve cancer treatment for future patients and provide a better understanding of the treatments that work best to treat CP-CML.

Patients must be receiving treatment with Imatinib (Gleevac), Dasatinib (Sprycel), or Nilotinib (Tasigna) which are tyrosine kinase inhibitors.



Category: Colorectal Cancer
CALGB 80702: A Phase III Trial of 6 Versus 12 Treatments of Adjuvant FOLFOX Plus Celecoxib or Placebo for Patients With Resected Stage III Colon Cancer

6 versus 12 cycles of chemotherapy with or without celecoxib - This randomized phase III clinical trial is being conducted to evaluate the effects (good and bad) of an oral drug called celecoxib (Celebrex) when given in combination with FOLFOX chemotherapy for patients with surgically treated stage III colon cancer.  Another purpose is to determine if giving patients celecoxib and chemotherapy decreases the risk of colon cancer recurrence. This study will also look at whether receiving FOFLOX chemotherapy for 6 treatments (12 weeks) is as good as 12 treatments (24 weeks) in preventing recurrence of colon cancer. 

Celecoxib is a sulfa non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and selective COX-2 inhibitor used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and to reduce numbers of colon and rectum polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

FOLFOX is a combination of the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin (LV), and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin®).   5-FU helps stops the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth, Leucovorin is not a chemotherapy drug, however it is used in combination with 5-FU to enhance its anti - cancer effects. 

Oxaliplatin stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing.

There are 4 treatment groups:

  • One group will receive 12 cycles of FOLFOX + Placebo daily
  • One group will receive 12 cycles of FOLFOX + Celecoxib daily
  • One group will receive 6 cycles of FOLFOX + Placebo daily
  • One group will receive 6 cycles of FOLFOX + Celecoxib daily
One cycle = 14 days of treatment.  Celecoxib/placebo will continue for 3 years or until unacceptable side effects.


Category: Bladder Cancer
CALGB 90601: A Randomized Double-Blinded Phase III Study Comparing Gemcitabine, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab to Gemcitabine, Cisplatin, and Placebo in Patients with Advanced Transitional Cell Carcinoma

Gemcitabine and Cisplatin With or Without Bevacizumab for Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer - This randomized double blind phase III clinical trial is being conducted to determine if adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to gemcitabine and cisplatin results in longer cancer free survival when compared to gemcitabine and cisplatin with a placebo for bevacizumab in treating patients with advanced transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract.

Bevacizumab is a targeted therapy that works by blocking a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that helps new blood vessels form.  Without new blood vessels, the growth of the tumor is slowed.  Gemcitabine is a chemotherapy that interferes with the metabolism and growth of cancer cells.  Cisplatin stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing

There are 2 treatment groups:

  • One group will receive gemcitabine, cisplatin and bevacizumab (Avastin) on day 1, followed by gemcitabine and cisplatin on day 8 of every 21 days for 6 courses.  Bevacizumab will then be given every 21 days as long as there is no disease progression or side effects.
  • The other group will receive gemcitabine, cisplatin and placebo for bevacizumab on day 1, followed by gemcitabine and cisplatin on day 8 of every 21 days for 6 courses.  The placebo for bevacizumab will then be given every 21 days as long as there is no disease progression or side effects.


Category: Lung Cancer
E1505: A Phase III Randomized Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab for Patients With Completely Resected Stage IB (> 4cm)-IIIA Non-Small Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab after surgery for lung cancer - This randomized clinical trial is being conducted to determine if chemotherapy with Bevacizumab (Avastin) results in longer survival when compared to chemotherapy* alone for patients with stage I - III non small cell lung cancer. 

There are several chemotherapy combinations used to treat non small cell lung cancer. The options for chemotherapy will be chosen by you and your physician.  Bevacizumab (Avastin) is a targeted therapy that works by blocking a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that helps new blood vessels form. Without new blood vessels, the growth of the tumor is slowed. Vinorelbine(Navelbine), cisplatin, and docetaxel(Taxotere) all stop the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing.  Gemcitabine(Gemzar) is a chemotherapy that interferes with the metabolism and growth of cancer cells. Pemetrexed (Alimta)helps stops the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

There are 2 treatment groups:

  • One group will receive chemotherapy* every 21 days for 4 cycles
  • The other group will receive bevacizumab (Avastin) with their chemotherapy*every 21 days for 4 cycles. The bevacizumab (Avastin) will continue every 21 days for up to one year.

*Chemotherapy Options - at physician discretion.

Vinorelbine IV Days 1 and 8
Cisplatin IV Day 1

Docetaxel IV Day  1
Cisplatin IV Day 1

Gemcitabine IV Days 1 and 8
Cisplatin IV Day 1

Pemetrexed IV Day 1
Cisplatin IV Day 1 
 



Category: Breast Cancer
E2108: A Randomized Phase III Trial of the Value of Early Local Therapy for the Intact Primary Tumor in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Conventional treatment with or without early surgery and radiation for metastatic breast cancer - This randomized phase III clinical trial is being conducted to determine if the addition of breast surgery (complete or partial removal of the breast) and radiation to conventional treatment results in a longer survival compared to conventional treatment alone.  Patients must have a new diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer and be receiving or willing to receive 4 months of initial conventional treatment prior study entry.

Conventional therapy for stage IV breast cancer includes anti-hormones and chemotherapy.  Anti-hormone therapy blocks the use of estrogen by the tumor cells and by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing.

There are 2 treatment groups.  Both groups will receive conventional treatment for stage IV breast cancer as recommended by their physician for four months.  If the tumor gets smaller, this is followed by one of the two treatments:

One group will get breast surgery (complete or partial removal of the breast) and radiation to the breast followed by the continuation of conventional therapy.

The other group will continue with conventional treatment as advised by the treating doctor. If you are in group two and the current treatment is no longer controlling the tumor in the breast, or your doctor feels you need surgery or radiation, you may receive this when you need it.


Category: Melanoma
ECOG 1609: A Phase III Randomized Study of Adjuvant Ipilimumab Anti-CTLA4 Therapy Versus High-Dose Interferon a-2b for Resected High-risk Melanoma

Ipilimumab or High-Dose Interferon Alpha-2b in for High-Risk Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery - This randomized phase III clinical trial is being conducted to determine if Ipilimumab results in longer cancer free survival when compared to high dose interferon alpha 2b for patients with stage III or IV melanoma that has been removed by surgery. 

Ipilimumab is a human monoclonal antibody and works by activating the immune system in its attack on cancer cells.

High-dose interferon alpha-2b is an antiviral drug that helps fight certain cancer growths.

There are 2 treatment groups:

  • One group will receive ipilimumab intravenously every 21 days for 4 courses.  Then the ipilimumab will be given every 12 weeks for a maximum of 4 courses unless there is disease progression or side effects.
  • The other group will receive high-dose interferon alpha-2b given intravenously Monday thru Friday for 4 courses. Then weekly on Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 48 weeks by subcutaneous injections.  The treatment will be stopped if there is disease progression or side effects.


Category: Gynecologic
GOG 0237: Comparative Analysis of CA-IX, p16, Proliferative Markers and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in the Diagnosis of Significant Cervical Lesions in Patients With a Cytologic Diagnosis of Atypical Glandular Cells (AGC)

Studying Biomarkers in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients With Abnormal Cervical Cells - This clinical trial is being conducted to determine if certain factors in the cervical cells called biomarkers (certain cancer indicators), including HPV can help identify which women with a diagnosis of atypical glandular cells (AGC) have a benign condition and which have a pre-cancerous condition or an invasive cancer that requires surgical removal.

Patients will be asked to undergo a PAP smear collection to provide a cervical specimen for biomarker testing to help determine which women with AGC have a benign condition and which women have a cancer or pre cancerous condition. Other procedures required are part of regular care and may be done even if patients do not participate in the study. Patients will be required to have a colposcopy, a procedure in which a special instrument is used to closely examine the cervix and vagina for signs of disease. Patients must not have had treatement for AGC prior to participation.